We recognize that with the evolving situation related to COVID-19, it can be difficult to keep track of information relevant to all points of a journey which may impact the travel experience of your guests and employees. 

We’ve put together a guide to help you make informed decisions for travel based on guidelines and restrictions from the Local, State, and Federal Governments in the United States. We will be updating this help document daily to include new information as it is made available by all levels of government. 

You may use this as a guide to help make informed decisions, but please note that we must also encourage everyone to continue listening to the warnings and information being supplied by your own Local, State and Federal Government.

If you are needing to cancel any upcoming trips, please let our Travel Experience team know by filling out this form

Local and State Restrictions for travel within the United States:

For the most up to date information, please reference this article. Even as governors lift orders, stricter local orders may remain in place. Please research specific county protocols before making any travel decisions.

Alabama: No stay at home order. with social distancing guidelines including beaches; gyms, retail stores, restaurant dining, bars and breweries, salons, entertainment venues. Gatherings of more than 10 people are permitted, including unlimited numbers for gatherings at beaches, with social-distancing rules.

Alaska: No stay at home order. Gov. Mike Dunleavy eased restrictions on several kinds of businesses starting April 24, giving Alaska among the first restarts in the nation. All businesses were allowed to open at full capacity May 22. At this time the State of Alaska does not mandate the general use of masks, limit group size, or business operations, but does encourage Alaskans to do their part to limit the spread of COVID-19. Large gatherings are permitted, with social distancing and permission of state public health officials.

Arizona: No stay at home order. Extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 15, but outlined a plan for retail stores and other businesses to begin opening sooner. Most businesses are now open under a “Return Stronger” plan. No limit to gathering sizes as long a social distancing is followed..

Arkansas: No stay at home order. They began a phased reopening in early May with the reopening of salons and gyms. Restaurants and large entertainment venues opened later in May with limits on customers and social distancing restrictions. Gatherings of 50 or fewer people are permitted.

California: Stay-at-home order in effect since March 19 . Gov. Gavin Newsom has led a phased and regional reopening. Starting May 12, restaurants and shopping centers were allowed to open in counties that meet certain criteria. On May 25, Mr. Newsom announced that houses of worship and in-store shopping could resume subject to county approval. Retail is now open statewide, though counties can impose their own restrictions. Gatherings of more than 10 are prohibited in most of the state.

Colorado: No stay at home order. Instead they have transitioned to a “safer at home” approach and opened retail stores, personal care businesses and restaurants in May. In June, the state continued its reopenings with gyms, bars and indoor and outdoor events. Gatherings of 10 people or fewer are permitted.

Connecticut: No stay at home order. The state’s stay-at-home order expired on May 20. An initial reopening began with retail stores and outdoor dining at restaurants, followed by a broader reopening that included gyms, personal care businesses and indoor dining on June 17. Indoor gatherings of up to 25 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 100 people permitted.

Delaware: No stay at home order. A limited number of businesses reopened with restrictions in May, followed by most businesses on June 1. The state increased capacity for some businesses on June 15. Indoor gatherings of 10 or fewer and outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people are allowed.

DC: No stay at home order. Announced a plan to reopen some businesses in the district starting May 29 and lifted the stay-at-home order. The District moved into Phase 2 of its reopening plan on June 22, allowing gyms, indoor dining, retail and personal care businesses to open. Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Florida: No stay at home order. Allowed limited openings for restaurants and stores in most counties starting May 4. Miami-Dade and Broward counties, the last remaining holdouts still shut down in Florida, began reopening May 18. Beaches are open to some activities. Most counties can open bars, entertainment venues and personal care businesses. Gatherings of more than 50 are prohibited.

Georgia: No stay at home order, effective April 24th. Gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited when six feet of social distance can't be maintained.

Hawaii: No stay at home order. They extended the state’s stay-at-home order through May 31 but allowed some businesses, including retail stores and repair shops in certain parts of the state, to begin reopening May 7. Other reopenings followed by county starting May 22. Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Idaho: No stay at home order. They moved into stage four of its reopening June 13, when large venues can open. Gatherings of any size permitted, with social distancing.

Illinois: No stay at home order. Loosened restrictions on certain outdoor activities starting May 1, and a broader reopening followed in much of the state on May 29. Chicago moved into phase three with the rest of the state on June 3. Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Indiana: No stay at home order. Since June 12, the state has been in "stage four" of its reopening plan, which allowed for the return of movie theaters, bowling alleys and large venues. Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted.

Iowa: No stay at home order. Loosened restrictions in 77 of the state’s 99 counties starting May 1, and in all counties on May 15. Capacity limits on businesses were lifted June 10. Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Kansas: No stay at home order. Reopening is at the descretion of each county. Gatherings of 45 or fewer are permitted.

Kentucky: No stay at home order. Announced a plan to reopen retail stores starting May 20. Houses of worship were allowed to open earlier after a federal judge intervened. Salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen in late May, but bars and venues remain closed until late June. Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Louisiana: No stay at home order. Allowed the state’s stay-at-home order to lift and an array of businesses to reopen at 25 percent capacity starting May 15. The state move into the second phase of its reopening plan on June 5, allowing the return of bars, tattoo parlors and event centers, among other businesses. Gatherings of more than 10 are permitted, as long as social-distancing rules are followed.

Maine: No stay at home order. Allowed some personal care businesses to begin reopening statewide May 1 and took a regional approach for other reopenings. Retail stores and restaurants were allowed to reopen statewide on June 1, but a previously announced reopening date for bars has been pushed back. Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

Maryland: No stay at home order. Allowed stores, salons and houses of worship to open up with social distancing requirements starting May 15. (The city of Baltimore opted out and remained closed until May 29.) Gyms, casinos and malls opened in mid-June. Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Massachusetts: No stay at home order. The latest phase, starting June 22, allowed for the resumption of indoor dining and personal care services. Gatherings of 10 or fewer are permitted.

Michigan: No stay at home order. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer took a regional approach to reopening, allowing some industries and business to open in some areas, while lifting the statewide stay-at-home order on June 1. On June 8, businesses including restaurants opened in all counties. Personal care services could resume statewide on June 15. Outdoor gatherings of up to 100 people and indoor gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Minnesota: No stay at home order. First allowed employees in certain agriculture, industrial and office settings to return to work starting April 27. After the stay-at-home order expired May 17, retail businesses were allowed to open at 50 percent capacity. Bars, restaurants and salons were closed until June. Gatherings of up to 25 people permitted.

Mississippi: No stay at home order. State’s stay-at-home order expired April 27 and lifted restrictions on retail stores, which could reopen to customers with limits. All businesses were allowed to open June 1. Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted indoors, and up to 100 people outdoors, as long as social-distancing rules are followed (or up to 20 people indoors and 50 people outdoors without social distancing).

Missouri: No stay at home order. Under the new order, all businesses, including large venues, concerts and movie theaters, are allowed to operate, as long as seating is spaced out to enforce social distancing. It has been announced that state would be lifting all restrictions beginning June 16. Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social-distancing practices are followed.

Montana: No stay at home order. Allowed reopening in phases, beginning with houses of worship on April 26. Montana is one of the few states where schools have the option to reopen this academic year, and a few schools began to reopen starting May 7. All businesses could reopen June 1, provided they follow certain guidelines. Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

Nebraska: No stay at home order. Announced a plan to reopen restaurants and salons in certain regions starting May 4, followed by all counties June 1. Moved most of the state into phase 3 of reopening on June 22. For those counties in phase 3 of reopening, gatherings of up to 10,000 people permitted, following capacity and social-distancing guidelines.

Nevada: No stay at home order. It was said that restaurants and personal care businesses could start to reopen on May 9, but Nevadans were encouraged to stay home. Casinos and gaming resumed June 4. Gatherings of 50 or fewer are permitted.

New Hampshire: No stay at home order. Certain retail stores and salons began reopening in May. Starting June 15, restaurants, gyms and other businesses could reopen. Gatherings of more than 10 people permitted.

New Jersey: No stay at home order. Lifted the state’s stay-at-home order on June 9 and allowed limited reopenings for certain businesses and industries. On June 15, the state reopened retail and outdoor dining, with more businesses set to follow. Indoor gatherings of 25 percent of a building's capacity, or 100 people, whichever is lower, and outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted.

New Mexico: No stay at home order. Extended New Mexico’s stay-at-home order through the end of May but allowed retailers, offices and houses of worship to open at limited capacities beginning May 16. Three northwestern counties with the most severe outbreaks were shut down until June 1. Gatherings of up to 5 people are permitted.

New York: No stay at home order. Limited and phased reopenings by region starting May 15. By June 24, everywhere but New York City had entered the third stage of reopening, which allows gatherings of up to 25 people. Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted in regions that have entered Phase 3.

North Carolina: No stay at home order: Allowed retail stores to open with limits on customers beginning May 8. Restaurants, personal care businesses and pools reopened May 22. On June 24, with cases counts trending upward, they paused the state's reopening plan and required residents to wear face coverings in public. Gatherings of up to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors are permitted.

North Dakota: No stay at home order. Allowed a variety of businesses to reopen starting May 1. Gatherings of 500 or fewer are permitted.

Ohio: No stay at home order. Began reopening retail stores on May 12 and allowed salons and barbershops to reopen shortly after. Entertainment venues such as bowling alleys, aquariums, zoos, movie theaters, and museums reopened in early June. Gatherings of up to 300 people at restaurants and banquet halls are permitted, following social-distancing rules.

Oklahoma: No stay at home order. Lifted restrictions on businesses starting with salons, barbers and pet groomers on April 24. Restaurant dining, movie theaters, gyms, houses of worship and sporting venues reopened statewide — with certain restrictions — starting May 1. Bars and nightclubs reopened on June 15. People are directed to avoid groups "that do not readily allow for appropriate social distancing."

Oregon: No stay at home order. Many counties to reopen movie theaters, bowling alleys, pools and offices starting June 5. By June 19, all counties were allowed to reopen restaurants, salons and gyms. Gatherings of up to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors are permitted for those counties that are in phase 2 of reopening.

Pennsylvania: No stay at home order. Allowing counties to open in phases. By June 5, all of the state was in some phase of reopening. Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted for those counties in the "green" phase.

Puerto Rico: No stay at home order. Restaurants, retail stores and other businesses were allowed to reopen in late May. In mid-June, they eased lockdown restrictions and allowed more businesses to reopen. Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

Rhode Island: No stay at home order. Allowed retail stores to reopen, with limits on the number of customers and with shoppers encouraged to “limit browsing time.” Rhode Island entered its second phase of reopening in June, with restaurants, gyms, salons, beaches and malls allowed to open. Gatherings of up to 15 people are permitted.

South Carolina: No stay at home order. The reopening began with retail stores, which are under instructions to operate at 20 percent capacity. Toursit attractions such as museums, aquariums, zoos and amusement parks reopened on May 26. Gatherings of up to 10 people are permitted.

South Dakota: No stay at home order. Gatherings of any size are permitted, as long as social distancing is practiced.

Texas: No stay at home order. All retail stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls were allowed to reopen May 1, with limited capacity. No explicit maximum, but Abbott's executive order urges individuals to "minimize social gatherings and minimize in-person contact with people who are not in the same household."

Tennessee: Regional re-opening. Announced reopening plans for most counties in the state, starting with restaurants on April 27. Retail stores were to follow on April 29 and gyms on May 1, all under restrictions for social distancing. Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted.

Utah: No stay at home order. Downgraded the state’s risk to “orange,” or moderate risk, allowing restaurant dining, gyms and salons to reopen with precautions starting May 1. Gatherings of all sizes permitted for those counties in the "new normal" phase.

Vermont: No stay at home order. Allowed small changes, such as the opening of farmers’ markets, before a broader reopening beginning with retail stores on May 18. Other businesses, such as gyms and restaurants, reopened in June. Gatherings of up to 25 people are permitted.

Virgina: No stay at home order. Announced that most of Virginia would begin its first phase of reopening starting May 15, when salons could open by appointment and restaurants and bars could allow outdoor dining in most counties. The reopening at first excluded northern Virginia, near Washington, D.C., but all counties were allowed to reopen May 28. Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted in those areas that are in phase 2 of reopening.

Washington: No stay at home order. Every county in the state has now moved into some phase of reopening, and many businesses are allowed to reopen in most counties. Gatherings of up to 50 people permitted for those counties that have qualified for Phase 3 of reopening).

West Virginia: No stay at home order. Lifted restrictions on certain businesses starting May 4 while encouraging people to stay at home. Gatherings of up to 100 people are permitted.

Wisconsin: No stay at home order. Most businesses have opened. Gatherings of up to 10 people indoors and 50 people outdoors are permitted.

Wyoming: No stay at home order. Most businesses have opened. Gatherings of up to 250 people are permitted.

The CDC does not generally issue advisories or restrictions for travel within the United States. However, cases of COVID-19 have been reported in many states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease and so the CDC is asking travelers to consider the following questions before traveling

  • Is COVID-19 spreading where you’re going?
  • Will you or your travel companion(s) be in close contact with others during your trip?
  • Are you or your travel companion(s) at higher risk of severe illness if you do get COVID-19?
  • Do you have a plan for taking time off from work or school, in case you get exposed to, or are sick with, COVID-19?
  • Do you live with someone who is older or has a severe chronic health condition?
  • Is COVID-19 spreading where you live?

International Restrictions:

Kayak has accumulated a list of the most up to date travel bans by country. Please reference this link for a full list of travel bans. 

Aside from the travel bans listed above, there is currently a level 4 travel warning filed by the Department of State, which advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.

If there is a case of COVID-19 at your event:

  • Separate anyone who has COVID-19 symptoms from others until they can go home.
  • Anyone with symptoms should not take public transportation or shared rides
  • Contact local public health officials.
  • Communicate with staff and attendees about possible exposure.
  • Clean and disinfect the event space.
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